Believe it or not, even the greatest movies can fall victim to bloopers in forms of errors and inaccuracies. As ridiculous as they are, most of these mistakes go unnoticed by the public but once they’ve been spotted, they usually cannot be unseen. That having said, some are go glaringly obvious that they stick out like a sore thumb and you wouldn’t need to press rewind and play a couple of times to catch it. And no, we’re not taking about the strategically-placed-so-that-it’s-noticable Easter Eggs that you’d so often spot in a Marvel movie.

These looks like someone has wilfully let them get through the filters into the film!

Here are some examples:

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1. Pulp Fiction

Though Quentin Tarantino is a notorious film junkie, he couldn’t stop this infamous gaff that showed off the bullet holes before any gun was fired, and clearly hoped that no one would notice the whacking great holes in the wall behind Jules and Vincent. Well, we did. It’s also not hard to see why Jules was so shocked not to be dead, considering 3 of said bullet holes are clearly visible behind his body, at impossible points of impact due to where the hitman is standing.

Ahem:

2. Braveheart

One of the most famous movie mistakes ever, and one of the most elusive – spend enough time online, and you’ll find that there are multiple theories concerning the appearance of the fabled “Braveheart” white van. Either it appears at Murron’s funeral, driving in the background, or it’s seen parked in the background of various battle scenes. Either way, it’s a fairly conspicuous addition to the film, and one that pretty badly compromises the period setting.

Watch:

3. Jurassic Park

In this scene, programmer-turned-thief Dennis Nedry appears to be chatting with an accomplice on his computer via a live feed. But the workstation clearly shows he’s speaking to a pre-recorded video instead. Well, we definitely expected more from the man responsible for designing Jurassic Park’s computer systems!

Oops?:

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4. Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines

The third entry in the “Terminator” franchise, which was directed by Jonathan Mostow and released in 2003, is teeming with errors. One of the most noticeable is when the identifying number on John Connor’s getaway Cessna 172 Skyhawk mysteriously changes. When John and Catherine are in the hangar at the runway, the Cessna’s tail number is N3035C. When the plane is shown in the air, the number is N3973F. When they land, the tail number changes back to N3035C.

The leader of the human resistance should have known better than to trust a machine like that:

<strong>4. Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines</strong>

The third entry in the Terminator franchise, which was directed by Jonathan Mostow and released in '03, is teeming with errors. One of the most noticeable is when the identifying number on John Connor's getaway Cessna 172 Skyhawk mysteriously changes. When John and Catherine are in the hangar at the runway, the Cessna's tail number is N3035C. When the plane is shown in the air, the number is N3973F. When they land, the tail number has changed back to N3035C. The leader of the human resistance should have known better than to trust a machine like that.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBo2nsoZuo4

5. Jaws

The brutal end to Quint in “Jaws” is one of the film’s most iconic and memorable moments, thanks in part to the actor’s incredible performance as the grizzled sea dog, and also the graphic nature of the attack. Obviously it’s a great big fake shark, but good artistry can usually transcend the limitations of the equipment. The only thing that spoils the scene somewhat is the very visible presence of a nice comfy cushion under Quint’s back, to stop the fake sharks fake teeth from really puncturing his soft, fleshy body, presumably.

Just to stick the knife in on the scene a little, Quint also lets go of Brody’s arm. Twice:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys4V-MSXnAM

6. Gladiator

In the Battle of Carthage re-enactment sequence, one of the chariots is upended, and crashes into the wall of the arena. But before it hits the wall, you can clearly see a gas canister, that is revealed when whatever is covering it on the back of the chariot falls off. I’m still not entirely sure why a horse-drawn vehicle would require gas power anyway, but capturing the fact on screen of a supposedly historically accurate film is just plain sloppy.

The film is actually full of errors, in terms of continuity, pure production errors, and historical inaccuracies, but this one sticks out a mile as the worst offender:

No film/movie editors were hurt in the process of this feature.

So, which one did you like (or rather, not like)? Do you know of any other jarring movie mistake(s) that we need to check out? Preferably those with video proof? Let us know in the comments box below!

Sources: 1, 2, 3.

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Lainey
Eats, sleeps, & breathes music, but drinks mostly coffee & okay, some wine - sometimes, a little too much. A little too obsessed with the number seven, is deathly afraid of horror movies, believes that she writes better than she speaks, & currently feeling a little strange writing a profile about herself.